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20130318
20130326
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CSPAN 25
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English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
exactly the religion of our candidates. there is nothing more important. host: she is gone. guest: rand paul's father is a christian and religious man. the republican party is going through rebuilding and redesign and try to figure out what they will do and rand paul could be a big part of that. he had a filibuster on the floor and i'm sure we will be hearing his name more in the future. host: mechanicsville, va., go ahead. caller: i have a question -- when you are debating about the budget, why do they continue to put amendments in there that have absolutely nothing to do with - the budget? guest: that the great question. it's because they can. there is a role in the senate that says they can attach strings to the budget and no one can stop them. given the opportunity that senators have, they took it. mideast policy got involved and to guns and so they did whatever they wanted to do. that was on full display. host: that was not covered in the lessons proffered by "school house rock." you talked about briefly but you can expand about how the in the congress over the budget on the house
, with all of its suffering, but also all of its salvation. it's a part of the three great religions, judism, christianity and islam that trace their origins to abraham and see jerusalem as sake red. and it's a story that has inspired communities across the globe, including me and my fellow americans. in the united states, a nation made up of people who crossed oceans to start anew were naturally drawn to the idea of finding freedom in our lands. to african americans, the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally growing up in far flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a ome. of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed o
reminiscing and thinking about the role of religion. it is an important piece for her. >> asked up his neck. >> first of all -- next up is nick. >> first of all, thank you for this great row graham. i am glad you are part of -- program. i'm glad you are part of it. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors. the most we have is what of our , we have an centers plaque. an a book where you get impression of louisa catherine that she is very involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it is just a surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises that are made during that time. would you mind commenting on those two things? that is louisa catherine's birth family. in maryland? do you know of them? >> her family was from maryland. her father was born in maryland. that is very important because that is how she makes her claim that she is an american. i met the war in london, but my father is an american. her uncle was the first governor of maryland. so, she has an important connection with maryland. she wa
and reflecting on the role of religion and it's very much an important piece for her. >> next up is nick in prince frederick, maryland. hi, nick. >> hi, how are you? first of all, thank you, c-span, for this great program. mr. smith, i'm very excited to get through. i think your work is great and i'm glad you're part of this series as well. two things i hope to get you to comment on. i live in calvert county. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors if not the first governor. there is not a sources linking her here. in the town center, there is a placard talking about her he had readty to the area. and there is an impression of louisa catherine that she is very much involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it's just on the surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises made during this time. would both of you mind commenting on those two things? >> the johnsons we wish to explain are louisa catherine's birth family. connections in calvert county, maryland, do you know of them? >> yes, her f
people from every walks of life and every religion and if they are willing to work hard they can success. that has to be more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syria situation but the moment of promise and danger in the arab world in north africa. >> thank you, mr. president. of mentioned the aftermath the assad regime. there's a lot of concern that the upheaval is creating extremism. how concerned are you that extremist could take over in syria and, perhaps worse than assad? usas hoping you could give an insight on how you brokered the call to netanyahu. and you have offered asylum that he rejected and does that offer still stand? thank you. >> well, i'm very concerned about syria becoming a place for extremists because extremists thrive in chaos. they thrive in failed states and in power vacuums. they don't have much to offer when it comes to building things but they are good about exploiting situations that, you know, are no longer functional. they fill that gap. that's why, i think it is so important for us to work with the international community to help accele
that the world religions have a lot in common, but there is something very special about christianity and the person of christ, and that is an extremely well documented -- i became somewhat against my own best interests as a scientist a believer. >> have you ever doubted that since? >> oh, sure. every believer have to have doubts. it is an element of belief, doubt, but doubt is a good thing because it lets you know what .ou need to dig deeper into >> what impact has it had on you as a scientist in that scientific community that views outwardly acknowledge yourself -- that you outwardly acknowledge yourself to be in? >> a god to whom one may pray. that is not hypothetical. perspective.eist scientists do not talk about that. i have written a book to speak about this because of a desire to particularly help those that are wrestling with the issues to see that there are ways. a comet from that of your about the waterfall i guess is an easy one -- that comment from that viewer about the waterfall i guess is an easy one. a creator that has an intelligence and a mind -- it was a moment of ha
are secular in their outlook, who believe that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. in fact, i would say and be necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. so, there is this conflict, and this conflict is not resolved on the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond.
of years of wrestling with this and beginning to recognize that the world religions have a lot in common, but there is something very special about christianity and the person of christ, and that is an extremely well documented -- i became somewhat against my own best interests as a scientist a believer. since? >> oh, sure. doubts. doubt is not the opposite of the leaf. -- of a belief. it is an element of belief, doubt, but doubt is a good thing because it lets you know what you need to dig deeper into. why is this bothering me? what have other people facing this come to understand that helps me? >> what impact has it had on you as a scientist in that scientific community that you outwardly acknowledge yourself to believe? >> i am not that different. 40% of working scientists believe in a personal god to whom you might pray. that is not hypothetical. that is a theist perspective. scientists do not talk about that. i have written a book to speak about this because of a desire to particularly help those that are wrestling with the issues to see that there are ways. that comment from that v
, she spends a lot of time reminiscing and reflecting on the role of religion and it's very much an important piece for her. >> next up is nick in prince frederick, maryland, hi, nick. >> first of all, thank you for this great program. i'm glad you are part of it. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors. the most we have is what of our town centers, we have a plaque. and a book where you get an impression of louisa catherine that she is very involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it is just a surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises that are made during that time. would you mind commenting on those two things? >> that is louisa catherine's birth family. in maryland? do you know of them? >> her family was from maryland. her father was born in maryland. that is very important because that is how she makes her claim that she is an american. i met the war in london, but my father is an american. her uncle was the first governor of maryland. so, she has an important connection w
, who believe that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. say and bewould necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. , andhere is this conflict ons conflict is not resolved the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond. and people find that quite difficult
the meaning of freedom of religion and the establishment of religion. we debate the meaning of freedom of speech. we debate what equality means and how it translates to equality on issues of race, gender, and sexuality. we debate the role of different branches of government, the role of the president as the commander in chief, and as the head of the executive branch. and the roles of congress and .he roles of the courts as much as they are contentious and changing in the general rinas of american life, they must in turn be translated and interpreted and applied to our armed forces. while it is sometimes true the political decision, the social policy decision, the legal and constitutional decision that emerges in a civilian arena, is transferred in exactly the same manner to our military. there are times when it is not. there are times when the particular necessities of national security or the particular intensity of the organization and values and mission of the military require some just -- adjustment. exactlyot be adopted in the same way in the context of our military. -- deeply gra
or religion or cult the arrogance of their superiority reminds us that they do not give us right. we grant them power. they do not make us free. we are free already. as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. we are america, and our politicians are only as powerful as we, the people, allow them to be. the nra ad -- philip rucker, how effective is the nra message right now? guest: a message like that is effective with the base of the nra and many americans that live in some of these dates -- it's dates -- states. you play and add like that in ,est virginia, north carolina north dakota, and it resonates. it is a message about the elite in washington and san francisco, which is a reference to nancy pelosi, the democratic leaders in the house, and it is really trying to create these cultural divisions between decision- makers in washington and people back home who have guns and use them for sport. host: "political" tells us that nra fundraising is that the best in a decade. guest: the nra also reports that membership is growing, something the nra has been effective and skilled
have to learn how to understand , accept, and appreciate different cultures of religions and beliefs and value diversity. monty on twitter. dirty water on twitter, jim writes in, the hate of ours in the black community is a train that has left the station years ago. in our facebook page, leonard writes in that republicans are not good at self-evaluations. they think they're perfect and that the voters are dumb. they call us low information. until they change that, they will continue to lose. we're taking republican calls this morning on the subject. danny is up next from ohio. danny, thanks for calling in. caller: hello. host: go ahead. caller: yeah, i just think the national republican party needs to quit cramming down -- their candidates down to the reagan democrats, which i started as a reagan democrat. i think that's where the party's going. i work in a union shop, and that's what you hear from ranking democrats is the party keeps cramming down these candidates like mitt romney and people just will not vote for them. host: danny from ohio this morning. one more quick of reince pr
come to you to talk about religion at all? guest: we would treat them -- that's another thing. -- re portrayed as just about oil and about greed, i take great exception to that. i believe it does a disservice to those men and women who went and volunteered to go, especially in our medical facilities. at one time, we were treating one of our wounded service members and the person who wounded him. and our folks gave the treatment that they were supposed to give. if anybody else in the world wants to throw stones at us in america, they can go right ahead, but i will point to those kinds of examples to show why we are the freest, greatest country in the world. when we go in -- we left. we did not take a part of iraq. we did not say this is going to be our little piece of ground did we did what we needed to do, and now we are gone -- of ground. andid what we needed to do now we are gone. we are out. iraq is a sovereign country. america, that is who we are. i think that needs to be communicated. host: clint in texas. a democratic caller. go ahead. caller: i just wanted to make a comment. i
paul. and i am an old time lutheran. is not to be trusted. it is important to know exactly the religion of our candidates. there is nothing more important. host: she is gone. father is apaul's christian and religious man. the republican party is going through rebuilding and redesign and try to figure out what they will do and rand paul could be a big part of that. he had a filibuster on the floor and i'm sure we will be hearing his name more in the future. host: mechanicsville, va., go ahead. caller: i have a question -- when you are debating about the budget, why do they continue to put amendments in there that have absolutely nothing to do with - the budget. ? guest: that the great question. it's because they can. there is a role in the senate that says they can attach strings to the budget and no one can stop them. that the opportunity senators have, they took it. mideast policy got involved and to guns and so they did whatever they wanted to do. that was on full display. not covered in the lessons proffered by "school house rock." you talked about briefly but you can expand about ho
and religion." we grant them power. we protect them. they do not make us free. as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. ourre america and politicians are only as powerful as we the people will allow. the latest from the nra, again focusing on guns, background checks. a look at guns and video games in our country. of course, front and center, following what happened in newtown, conn. last december. the hearst newspaper focusing on all of these issues, this writing -- chronicle," exploring one aspect of our culture, the prevalence of violence in our media. read some of the opinions available online. a lot of people weighing in on all of this. brian joins us from sterling heights, michigan. morning. caller: how are you? host: fine, thank you. caller: excellent. video games, as long as a , let thes a scapegoat parents raise the kids. back in the 1980's and 1990's anytime someone killed someone they blamed metal music. it is the same thing here. someone was out, they start shooting at people -- people play video games. he played video games. that is what it is. no. it starts at
of religion and freedom of the press. secondly, it is the economics and the bonds that bind us together. the united states represent about one fourth of the world's gross domestic product. the nations of europe represent more. nato is about 50% of the gdp. it is $4 trillion per year across the atlantic. so i think the transatlantic connection has an important economic component as well. third, geography does matter. sometimes people say to me, they are the bastions of the cold war. i would counter by saying that it's not. they are forward operating bases in the 21st century. they allow us to extend support from eucom in that area as well. fourth, i would say that nato would serve together around the world is a wide variety of missions that we can talk about this morning. fifth and finally, nowhere else in the world will we find such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad to talk about that today. but i do believe these connecti
to their religion or ethnicity, are starting to push back in some instances. there is a great deal of concern. i want to assure you, i mentioned i have met people the pre syrian army, and we have highlighted the worries of minority groups and christians, not that we are against the sunni majority of syria. we are not. the minorities are nervous and there might -- their rights must be protected and respected. we hear good things from them. i can tell you for example that they have met christian leaders from some of the communities in syria and have told us afterwards that their meetings were populated. we have to keep pushing in that direction. >> thank you. if you could touch on the chemical weapons issues. was called a red line and there have been reports as recently in the last 24 hours about what is actually happening on the ground, whether they have been used, whether they will be used. if you could just talk about what the administration is doing to prevent the transfer of these weapons to groups. thank you. >> we viewed this issue with extreme seriousness. it is incredibly important to us.
that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. in fact, i would say and be necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. so, there is this conflict, and this conflict is not resolved on the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond. and people find that quite difficult to understand, aft
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)